Sydney CBD venues to face further restrictions
May28

Sydney CBD venues to face further restrictions

LAST UPDATED // Wednesday, 28 May 2014 16:10 Written by // Cec Busby

The NSW government has released a range of new measures restricting the service of alcohol in bars, clubs and pubs across the CBD, including a ban on shots, doubles and pre-mixed drinks after midnight.

The new measures are part of the Sydney CBD Plan of Management released by the NSW Government today and are expected to be rolled out in licensed premises in July.

Other measures which will come into force on July 18 include a ban on anyone wearing ‘gang colours’ from entry to CBD venues;  a no glass policy after midnight in venues with a history of violence, and a four drink maximum drink order in place after midnight (two drinks after 2am).

Hospitality Minister Troy Grant said the new rules would complement existing licensing restrictions, such as the 1.30am lockouts and 3am last drinks. He described the measures as a call to arms from the community.

"We've got a clear message for those buffoons who bring a bad image and name to our city and behave appalling to lead to violence: enough is enough. We're not going to cop it any more."

From October 2014 security guards and all staff serving alcohol must hold a Responsible Service of Alcohol (RSA) certificate. RSA marshals must also be employed during "high risk" periods in venues identified as having a history of violence.

AHA NSW Director of Policing John Green said the one size fits all approach of the new restrictions needed to be evaluated sooner rather than later.

“Here we have yet another suite of measures rolled out across all venues regardless of whether or not they have had any issues with alcohol-related violence in the past,” he said.

“Venues are already working closely with police and the community on targeting those thugs doing the wrong thing – that’s why assault levels in and around licensed premises are at their lowest levels since the 1990s.”

Green believes the new restrictions unfairly penalise businesses with no history of violence and more time should be spent evaluating  the criminal behaviour of people on the street.

“When is enough enough? All businesses need certainty, but unfortunately every other month new restrictions are being imposed on licensed premises which have no record of violence.

“Instead, we should be focusing on measures directed at the criminal behaviour of people on our streets.  We also need to ensure there is a proper and considered evaluation of the total impact of these measures.”

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Cec Busby

Cec Busby

Cec Busby is the news editor of SX and GayNewsNetwork.com.au.

Leave a comment

You are commenting as guest. Optional login below.